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Silver Lining in French Economy

martine.joly - 27-nov.-2014 10:41:55
Silver Lining in French Economy   France’s Silver Economy is turning into a precious commodity, growing at 4% during the past few years and projected to create 300,000 jobs by 2020. The high value resource behind the silver economy is expected to grow healthily, providing an abundant market for French and foreign business. However, the most shocking element of this market is that it has nothing to do with metals.   Products for consumers over the age of 65 In fact the silver economy is a term that refers to the economy that produces products for consumers over the age of 65, who require services tailored to their specific tastes and needs, from accommodation to health and leisure.   According to demographic projections, 23 million French people or simply one third of the population will be over 65 by 2030 . Many other European and Western countries are experiencing similar developments in their demographics and their retirees are searching for communities across the continents that are very specific. Furthermore, wealthy retirees from Eastern countries are also looking for lifestyles with a certain quality that they may not be able to find so readily back home.   In France : a focus on health and quality of living Amina Sambou, project manager of the Silver Economy at Ubifrance, is confident that France can excel in servicing the domestic and foreign market: “in France, we have a focus on health and quality of living which has already created a market with a strong infrastructure for retirees who are interested in quality of living.” Therefore it is not a surprise that French companies are experiencing interest from consumers in countries like Japan, South Korea, and China who, according to Mrs. Sambou, are “interested in the French way of ageing.”   New French companies are already popping up in anticipation of vast opportunities in the next decade. Silver Valley is the French answer of California’s Silicon Valley, combining technology and location to create a future for the Silver Economy. Less than 10 kilometers from Paris, this collaboration of French businesses will create a nexus for all sides of the market: research facilities for innovation partners, a business park for product and service oriented businesses, and attractive real state for retirees.   The older market segments will become more relevant for all businesses in the next decade Demographics, such as longer life expectancy, decrease in birthrate and retirement of the ‘baby boomer’ generation are certainly reasons why the older market segments will become more relevant for all businesses in the next decade. However, this is not the only reason why businesses need to stay ahead of the market: seniors in France represent 43% of income, 60% of real estate and 72% of financial investments. Therefore, it’s not just the size of the market but also its focus on high value products, which make it a priority for all business strategists. The French organization in this market is unparalleled.   Six French regions have been chosen to lead the Silver Economy in France Six French regions have been chosen to lead the Silver Economy in France, with each producing its own nexus similar to that of Silver Valley. Another example is Toulouse’s aptly named campaign “So Toulouse.” The 4 th city in France has been recently made famous for being recession proof – a beacon of private sector growth in France over the last decade. Part of the success of this city and region has been its focus on education and technological innovation. This has translated into smart services for seniors, including smart homes, e-health services, and a hospital solely dedicated to the elderly. Also, the region’s status as the 2 nd most popular agro food region in France does not hurt its already fantastic pitch.   So far it seems that a large part of the French know-how has to do with elements rooted in France itself. However, much of the French advantage is exportable, and French companies have been finding successes in such events as last June’s Silver Economy connection in Atlanta.   Two pilot programs with two large senior living and homecare organizations… Sandrine Sauvage-Mack, Senior Trade Advisor at Ubifrance, recounts how the French multi product and service conglomerate La Valeriane was able to secure two pilot programs with two large senior living and homecare organizations: “After a great first impression with Leading Age, the American Federation for the ageing populations, they were certain to add more pilots and clinical trials with American universities and research centers.” Ubifrance, the French agency for export promotion with 80 offices over seas , will continue promote French companies at events dedicated to the French Silver Economy abroad and at home.   Clic here for more information about French companies http://www.ubifrance.com/french-exporters-directory/search.aspx   Or contact The French Trade Commission UBIFRANCE in your country.

PRESS: Boom Go the Millenials

Jeff Siegel - 26-avr.-2013 19:16:41
John’s Grocery in Iowa City is an upscale wine retailer whose customers include doctors and employees of the nearby University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. As such, says wine buyer Wally Plahutnik, his customers are knowledgeable and service oriented, regardless of age and demographic. Except for one very intriguing thing.   “I can’t get the older ones to use the camera on their phone to take a picture of the wine label,” he says. “The younger ones, no problem. But the older customers still come in and tell me they had a bottle of wine, but can’t remember the name. And when I ask them why they don’t use the camera, they just sort of look at me.”   In this, Plahutnik is in the middle of one of the biggest changes the wine business has ever seen—the revolution in consumer demographics, of which the role of new technology is just one small part. The Baby Boomers, born between 1948 and 1962 and widely regarded as the best friend that retailers and restaurateurs ever had, are becoming increasingly less important in the marketplace. Their replacement? The Millennials, two generations behind them but already numerically more significant among core wine drinkers, according to the 2012 Wine Market Council report. Though the Boomers make up 38% of wine drinkers, they consume only 32% of the wine. The numbers for Millennials are 29% and 38%.   For more information, read the full article here and follow us @UBIwinespirit  and on our Facebook page .

Sparkling Show at the Mercedez-Benz Fashion Week in New York

Ana Maria Schell - 05-oct.-2012 00:47:55
For this year’s Mercedez-Benz Fashion Week in New York, UBIFRANCE presented the French Textile Collection – a unique partnership with the Academy of Art University.   The following prestigious French textile mills donated pristine fabrics to be used in the Spring 2013 collections: print (AB CREATIONS); silk, jacquards (BELINAC, DENIS&FILS, PHILEA, SPRINTEX); wools (CLARENSON); lace (SOPHIE HALLETTE, SOLSTISS); knits (DEVEAUX, HENITEX INTERNATIONAL, PHILEA, SPRINTEX); velvet fabric, stretch corduroy fabric, jeans wear, pigment dyed (VELCOREX); and technic/sports fabrics (AVELANA, ROUDIÈRE).    The recent M.F.A. and B.F.A. graduates who collaborated on the French Textile Collection are: Iglika Vasileva Matthews, Jisun Lee, Liza Quinones, Yanfei Fan, Jessie Liu, Tanja Milutinovic, Ginie C.Y. Huang, Stephina Touch and Jarida Karnjanasirirat.   The event showcased fresh designs that elegantly combined French graphics and texture: strips, pop art prints, metallic laces and conceptual florals and wowed a mix of traditional and chic American audience.   With its renewed participation at the Fashion Week in New York, Academy of Art University found in the French fabrics the perfect base to sketch and design the looks for the Spring 2013 collection. “This season, we took a peek inside our designers’ notebooks to find out where the ideas for their Spring ’13 collections originated, and found an array of images, and fabrics almost as beautiful as the garments themselves”. Learn more about the partnership , watch the runway video , or capture the looks on our Pinterest Page.      Please consult our press review  to read more about the Event. For more information about French designers and fashion trends, follow us on Twitter !

French Video Game Innovation at E3 2011 Next Month

Ubifrance Press USA - 19-mai-2011 17:58:37
The French Pavilion will be hosting 11 video games sector companies at the E3 Expo trade show  in Los Angeles from June 7th to 9th, 2011. E3 Expo is the video games industry’s foremost annual meeting worldwide. By gathering in one venue all independent studios and multinationals in the sector, as well as their purchasing media and major industry analysts, E3 is the place to be to test the waters in new trends, whether in terms of business, innovation or creativity. This year’s French Pavilion, sponsored by UBIFRANCE - French Trade Commission, will host 11 French companies that include game designers, creative agencies and game testing services. In France, there are now over 15 million individuals who play video games. The players’ average age hovers around the 30 mark. France has many industry players (publishers, developers, game creators) who are acknowledged the world over for the quality of their productions. The turnover in France for the video games industry is estimated at close to €2 billion if one includes software and hardware sales for consoles and PCs. In 2009, there were about 400 companies in France working in the video games sector: 150 studios, 60 publishers, a number of engineering service providers (motion capture, game design, quality tests, localization/translation, communication) and middleware suppliers. Then about 15 wholesale distributors and 15 retail networks (brick & mortar and online stores) complete the picture. The Paris and Lyon regions alone host over three-quarters of sector players (including 60% just for Ile-de-France). Other job pool areas for the sector are the Nord-Pas-de-Calais, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur and Languedoc-Roussillon regions. Come and meet the 11 French companies in attendance at the French Pavilion who represent the video games industry in France. 1. Bug Tracker : Game and software testing agency 2. Bulkypix : Game developer for smartphones and tablets 3. Dynamixyz : 3-D facial analysis and synthesis 4. Epawn : Flat screen auxilary unit for smartphone and tablet games 5. Lexis Numérique : Independent game design studio 6. Nemopolis : Developer of family and educational multi-platform games 7. Playsoft : Develops games for molbile, tablet and Facebook applications 8. Smack Down Productions : Multi-platform independent game designer 9. Takeoff : Creative agency in design, video and interactive applications 10. Voxler : Voice interaction and transformation technologies 11. Wizarbox : Multi-platform video game developer Exhibitor catalogue available upon request. For more information, please contact: UBIFRANCE - FRENCH TRADE COMMISSION Nicolas Le Goff Technology Trade Advisor E-mail: nicolas.legoff@ubifrance.fr Web: www.ubifrance.com/us  
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